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Resources

NYC Charter School Test Scores: Math and ELA (2011-12)

The Charter Center is committed to a sector built upon accountability and results for kids. Accordingly, we have conducted an analysis of New York City charter school state test scores that will allow the public to better understand the performance of individual schools and the sector overall. It is our hope that this report spurs conversations, further investigation and best practice sharing.

Data: The New Stupid

Educators have made great strides in using data.  But danger lies ahead for those who misunderstand what data can and can't do.  This abstract from Education Leadership is a useful report for school leaders who need to learn the do's and don'ts of using data effectively.

A Tale of Two Schools' Data

Two teachers are about to get their first look at their schools' student achievement reports. Although they teach in different districts, Joseph and Zindzi have been leading parallel teaching lives for a number of years. They both teach mathematics in schools of similar size, ethnic composition, and socioeconomic demographics.  Read this fascinating report to find out what happens.

NYC Charter School Test Scores: Math and ELA (2010-11)

The Charter Center is committed to a sector built upon accountability and results for kids. Accordingly, we have conducted an analysis of New York City charter school state test scores that will allow the public to better understand the performance of individual schools and the sector overall. It is our hope that this report spurs conversations, further investigation and best practice sharing.

View the data interactively »

Sample Data Dashboard

A Data Dashboard is an essential tool for all charter schools.  It enables school leaders to instantly check a variety of metrics and assess where their students are at with respect to standardized testing and attendance among others.  This sample is from Gotham City Charter School.

Creating Data-Driven Schools

Many school districts underutilize one of the most powerful and common symbol systems available to them—numbers—to monitor, evaluate, and revise programs and policies.  In this abstract from Education Leadership, a trio of authors examine new ways for school leaders and teachers to make the most of the data available to them.

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